Episode 701: Sea Turtles: The Lost Years

The lives of all sea turtles begin once their eggs are laid on the beach by nesting females. They are left alone to fend for themselves against predators, the environment, and human impacts. Researchers have long known that once these tiny sea turtles reach adulthood, they will mate and females will return to the same beaches where they first hatched. But the great mystery lies in those years in-between. Where do juvenile sea turtles go once they reach the water? For decades this gap in knowledge was referred to as “the lost years.” Now, a team of researchers in Florida has found an innovative way to tag and track these tiny turtles in ways no one had thought possible.

Experts

Meet the experts featured in this episode.


Special Thanks:


Jim Abernethy's Scuba Adventures
216 North Federal Highway
Lake Park, Florida 33403
1 (888) 901-DIVE (3483)


Image Credits

Changing Seas would like to thank the following individuals and institutions who kindly allowed their footage, images and other media to be used in this production:

Jim Abernethy

Alexander Gaos

ICAPO (Eastern Pacific Hawksbill Initiative)

Sergio Figuera

Kate Mansfield

Pew Oceans Commission

Friend of Turtles

Pond 5

Projeto TAMAR

Save-A-Turtle, Inc. of the Florida Keys

Videoblocks

Ingrid Yanez

Web Extras

Marine Turtle Research Group Field Work

The Marine Turtle Research Group (MTRG) has been netting for turtles in the Indian River Lagoon, Florida for over 30 years as part of a long-term project examining trends in abundance and health of coastal juvenile turtles in Central Florida. The MTRG samples in the Lagoon twice a month, year round.


Funding for this episode of Changing Seas was provided by: